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Month in Review: February 2020

 

The start to 2020 has been very busy, very challenging and it is definitely a testament to the resilience of the Wot-if? Team and our participants that we have carried on despite flooding, shack fires, service protests and, unfortunately, another break-in. As the song goes, “We get knocked down, but we get up again!”

 

OUR IMPACT STATEMENT

Wot-if Impact statement: Participants in our programmes achieving thriving and resilient livelihoods

The Wot-if? Team came together during two thought-provoking and strategically important workshops: The Global Warriors workshop was held in November where we were inspired to work on ourselves as a strong, but kind team. We chose the team mascot: a pangolin, because it has a hard shell, but a soft inside. It is also unique… as are we.

 

Wot-if team members participating in activity

 

Building on this amazing journey, in January we were led by Embedding Impact to apply the Theory of Change to our reason for being and strategy. We now have a clear road map and renewed sense of purpose to facilitate our participants to achieve thriving and resilient livelihoods.

Thank you to Globalwarriors.com and Embedding Impact for assisting us on this journey.

 

TECH AND CREATIVE

 

Wot-if participants working on live streaming set

WATCHA shadowing opportunity – On the 12th of February, three of our videographers were given the opportunity to broadcast with Watcha at the TUKS Athletic Stadium, as a proof of concept. They were given valuable field work experience, working on live streaming and camera work. The day was so successful that there may be other opportunities to gain experience.

 

Digital lab kids posing with robots

Ericsson Digital Lab – 30 excited children enrolled in this wonderful opportunity to learn about robotics, game development and electronics. Five Participants have been trained up as facilitators for the rollout. Their enthusiasm and commitment to helping these children is heart-warming.  Many of the learners have little or no exposure to the digital and tech world, so this is a potentially life-changing experience.

 

Goethe CET award winners posing

Internships Sponsored by Goethe Institut – Last year, our Kasi Creative Propeller group participated in The Creative Economies in Townships (CET) programme run by The Goethe Institut. As part of this programme, they followed a sales training course that took place over 6 months, which culminated in an expo where each participant was required to present their business to a panel of judges. We are very proud to announce that 5 of our participants came out on top, winning internship placements in their respective fields. The internships commenced at the beginning of February, and this is what some of the participants have to say:

“I have learned a lot here because as a content creator I never knew exactly how to write a treatment or how to break it into a sellable content” – Patrick Merementsi, videographer

“In an attempt to enrich my design skills, I’m actually learning more about other things I didn’t even have in mind, like hard deadlines, effective and concise visual communication and large print design.” – Sifiso Masilela, Filmmaker

 

GREENING AND SUSTAINABILITY

 

Butternuts growing in Wot-if vegetable garden

The Seeds of Hope Project – These impressive butternuts were grown from seeds our Roots & Shoots children traded for Eco Bucks (for trading in the Eco Trading Store). The seeds were planted in the veggie garden on Mandela day and were then harvested to produce our Ubu lunches, a healthy meal available to our participants. This is the circular economy in action.

 

Roots & Shoots kids working in food garden

The Diepsloot Greening club (run by Roots and Shoots SA)– has been very active this term. They bring in compost and recycling materials  that can be used in the garden or to earn Ecobucks (virtual “currency” that can be exchanged in the Eco Trading Store). The group has grown to a fabulous 115 participants this year and we’re delighted to welcome our new volunteer facilitator, Petunia, who will be starting in the last week of February.

This term the children have already identified many projects that they would like to undertake for 2020:

Animals –  Bird Feeders

Environment – Recycling & Wetland Clean-ups

People – Food Gardens & Knitting squares for blankets

The participants also developed their own Code of Conduct based on the way they would like to be treated. We used this opportunity to cover what respect means to different people, and examples of how to show respect to animals, people and the environment in Diepsloot. Our Social Worker, Sheila explained to the children that elders in their community are not always right just because they are older than them. Showing respect to someone does not require that you have to accept behaviour that you know is wrong or that makes you feel uncomfortable or unsafe. The children were given examples and information on who to reach out to, should they need to talk about any form of abuse.

 

Happy, carefree kids

The Emergency Pedagogy team held a full morning session with all the participants, and gave a briefing with all the facilitators present on the day. This covers how to work in the education space with children who are affected by trauma. Please visit the website for more information

 

The Saturday Youth Development programme –started on the 25th January at Shumbashaba. We continued with the theme of respect for animals, people and the environment. The two groups developed a song that embodies this meaning for them.

 

MEMORABLE MOMENT

 

Diepsloot boy with pram purchased in Eco Trading Store

This special young man saved 350 Ecobucks to buy this double pram for his mom. He wanted to make it easier for her to carry his siblings through the township. His selflessness attracted the Good News Guy who featured him in an article. The second-hand pram was donated to the Trust. Wot If? accept donations from the public to help them stock the Eco Trading Store. Some of the things that can be purchased using Ecobucks includes school stationery, clothing, household items such as crockery and cutlery, food items etc.